Pre-congress Workshop

Pre-Congress Workshop will be held on April 30th 2019

Prof. Adrian Wells
University of Manchester

Prof. Hans Nordahl
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

MCT for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in Individual and Group Formats

Dr. Costas Papageorgiou
Priory Hospital, Altrincham

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)can be a complex mental health problem to treat. Growing empirical evidence supports the implementation of metacognitive therapy (MCT; Wells, 2009) for OCD in both individual (Fisher & Wells, 2008; Shareh et al., 2010; van der Heiden et al., 2016) and group (Papageorgiou et al., 2018; Rees & van Koesvel, 2008) formats to maximise therapeutic effectiveness and addressesfundamental limitations of current treatments.MCT for OCD specifically aims to modify two domains of metacognitive beliefs:(1) beliefs about the significance or dangerousness of intrusive thoughts and feelings and (2) beliefs about the need to perform rituals, both of which have been shown to be more closely involved in the maintenance of OCD than inflated responsibility, intolerance of uncertainty, and perfectionism. The overall objective of this skills-based clinical workshop is to outline the components of MCT for OCD and highlight effective practical adaptations for its delivery in group formats.The following areas will be covered: an overview of the phenomenology and current treatment of OCD;the metacognitive model of OCD;summary of empirical evidence supporting the metacognitive model and therapy of OCD; assessment and measurement of OCD and other relevant constructs; case conceptualisation; socialisation; detached mindfulness; exposure and response commission (ERC); metacognitively-delivered exposure and ritual prevention; challenging metacognitive beliefs; behavioural experiments; developing new plans for processing, and relapse prevention. A combination of lecture, discussion, experiential, role-plays, and case presentations will be used to facilitate this workshop.

Key learning objectives:
(1) To gain up-to-date knowledge of research in metacognitive theory and therapy of OCD
(2) To understand the principal features of the metacognitive model and therapy of OCD
(3) To become familiar with the metacognitive treatment strategies and techniques for OCD
(4) To gain insight into effective adaptations of MCT for OCD for its implementation in group formats

MCT for Health Anxiety 

Dr. Robin Bailey

In this workshop the metacognitive model of health anxiety will be presented and participants will learn how to use this as a basis of case conceptualisation and treatment (Bailey & Wells, 2013, 2014, 2015). It will focus on interpersonal issues such as how to avoid working with the content of patient’s catastrophic misinterpretations when disease conviction is high and subtly providing “medical” reassurance. The workshop will also examine metacognitions problematic in health anxiety, such as, ‘beliefs about biased thinking’ and how “feeling better” can be a major trigger for relapse.

Workshop participants will learn:

  1. The metacognitive model of health anxiety.
  2. Metacognitive treatment of health anxiety.
  3. How to avoid engagement with the content of patients’ distress.4. To identify problematic metacognitive beliefs that can lead to relapse.

MCT for Depression in Individual and Group Formats

Dr. Costas Papageorgiou
Priory Hospital, Altrincham

Growing empirical evidence supports the implementation of metacognitive therapy (MCT) for rumination and depression in both individual (Hagen et al., 2017; Wells et al., 2009, 2012) and group (Dammen, Papageorgiou & Wells, 2014; Papageorgiou & Wells, 2015) formats to maximise therapeutic effectiveness, prevent depressive relapse or recurrence, and address fundamental limitations of current treatments. MCT for depression aims to remove the metacognitive causes of rumination, which is a core process implicated in the maintenance and perpetuation of depression.The overall objective of this skills-based clinical workshop is to outline the components of  individual MCT for depression (Wells, 2009; Wells & Papageorgiou, 2004) and highlight effective practical adaptations for its delivery in group formats. The following key areas will be covered: the metacognitive model of rumination and depression; measurement of rumination and related constructs; case conceptualisation and socialisation; attention training and detached mindfulness; modifying metacognitive beliefs; developing new plans for processing, and relapse prevention. A combination of lecture, discussion, experiential, role-plays, and case presentations will be used to facilitate this workshop.

Key learning objectives:
(1) To gain up-to-date knowledge of the phenomenology of rumination and its relationship with depression
(2) To understand the principal features of the metacognitive model and therapy of rumination and depression
(3) To become familiar with the specific metacognitive treatment strategies and techniques for depression
(4) To gain insight into effective adaptations of MCT for depression for its implementation in group formats

Abstract Submissions

If you’re interested in presenting a symposium at the 2019 Metacognitive Therapy Conference in Prague, register here. The deadline is 31st October 2018, and all symposium submissions will be reviewed by the scientific committee.

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