Pre-congress Workshop

Pre-Congress Workshops will be held on April 30th 2019

The Advanced Use of Detached Mindfulness

Prof. Adrian Wells
University of Manchester

Detached mindfulness is one of the core techniques of MCT. It requires that the recipient develops a specific stance in relation to thoughts that is coupled with the regulation of specific forms of maladaptive processing. The technique can be used to modify different components of metacognition, including: metacognitive beliefs, flexible cognitive control, meta-awareness, metacognitive goals and the subjective model of mind. This workshop is aimed at deepening the therapist’s conceptual understanding of detached mindfulness and how it can be used to produce these different types of change. These methods will be illustrated with reference to treating a range of disorders that includes obsessive-compulsive disorder and complex cases involving negative self-concept. The workshop will involve didactic presentation, live use of role-play to practise skills and processes and videotape demonstrations. The workshop is suitable for MCT therapists at all levels.

Reference:

Wells, A. (2009). Metacognitive therapy for anxiety and depression. New York: Guilford Press. (pp. 71-88).

Metacognitive Therapy for Patients with Emotionally Unstable Personality: Clinical Application and Management

Prof. Hans Nordahl
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Metacognitive therapy (MCT) is based on the Self-regulatory executive function model (S-REF), which states that psychological disorders are caused by failure of self-regulation as a result of executive function biases and problems with maladaptive mental and behavioural strategies. In the current workshop I will present the treatment and how it is applied to patients with emotional instability personality problems. There are three areas which are addressed; 1) Modifying self-defeating beliefs and behavioural strategies, 2) Improving the executive functions, attentional processes, and self-regulation of thinking and 3) Increasing functional skills and developing goals of future social skills and behaviour

The program is named the ERIS protocol and the first phase lasts a year and from there the community services continue the follow-up of the patient. Follow-up of job placement and community psychiatric service during and after treatment are important for continuous improvement. In an open trial we have found that this approach was associated with improving stability in affect and behaviour and also reducing self-defeating beliefs and behaviour. This pre-congress workshop will present how to use the ERIS program with these patients and how to manage the challenges that commonly arise in working with these clients.

Developing Greater Skill and Understanding in the Use of Meta-level Discourse in MCT

Prof. Adrian Wells
University of Manchester

Prof. Hans Nordahl
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

The meta-level discourse is fundamental in the correct and optimal practise of MCT, but this is one of the core skills that therapists find difficult. This difficulty arises from several factors that among others includes the dissimilarity that exists between the MCT model and the focus of other psychotherapy approaches, the need to contain the clients own narratives, the ability to recognise object-level drift, and negative effects of therapists beliefs about the necessary ‘ingredients’ of good psychotherapy. In this workshop, which is designed for therapists at all levels of competency, the MCT discourse is examined in relation to achieving the following central goals in the process of treatment: (1) socialisation to the model; (2) bridging and motivating the client; (3) implementing detached mindfulness; (4) effective change within the Attention Training Technique; (5) challenging metacognitive beliefs. The workshop will involve didactic presentation, live use of role-play to demonstrate skills and processes and videotape demonstration. The workshop is suitable for MCT therapists at all levels.

Reference:

Wells, A. (2009). Metacognitive therapy for anxiety and depression. New York: Guilford Press. (pp. 41-50).

MCT for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in Individual and Group Formats

Dr. Costas Papageorgiou
Priory Hospital, Altrincham

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)can be a complex mental health problem to treat. Growing empirical evidence supports the implementation of metacognitive therapy (MCT; Wells, 2009) for OCD in both individual (Fisher & Wells, 2008; Shareh et al., 2010; van der Heiden et al., 2016) and group (Papageorgiou et al., 2018; Rees & van Koesvel, 2008) formats to maximise therapeutic effectiveness and addressesfundamental limitations of current treatments.MCT for OCD specifically aims to modify two domains of metacognitive beliefs:(1) beliefs about the significance or dangerousness of intrusive thoughts and feelings and (2) beliefs about the need to perform rituals, both of which have been shown to be more closely involved in the maintenance of OCD than inflated responsibility, intolerance of uncertainty, and perfectionism. The overall objective of this skills-based clinical workshop is to outline the components of MCT for OCD and highlight effective practical adaptations for its delivery in group formats.The following areas will be covered: an overview of the phenomenology and current treatment of OCD;the metacognitive model of OCD;summary of empirical evidence supporting the metacognitive model and therapy of OCD; assessment and measurement of OCD and other relevant constructs; case conceptualisation; socialisation; detached mindfulness; exposure and response commission (ERC); metacognitively-delivered exposure and ritual prevention; challenging metacognitive beliefs; behavioural experiments; developing new plans for processing, and relapse prevention. A combination of lecture, discussion, experiential, role-plays, and case presentations will be used to facilitate this workshop.

Key learning objectives:
(1) To gain up-to-date knowledge of research in metacognitive theory and therapy of OCD
(2) To understand the principal features of the metacognitive model and therapy of OCD
(3) To become familiar with the metacognitive treatment strategies and techniques for OCD
(4) To gain insight into effective adaptations of MCT for OCD for its implementation in group formats

MCT for Health Anxiety 

Dr. Robin Bailey

In this workshop the metacognitive model of health anxiety will be presented and participants will learn how to use this as a basis of case conceptualisation and treatment (Bailey & Wells, 2013, 2014, 2015). It will focus on interpersonal issues such as how to avoid working with the content of patient’s catastrophic misinterpretations when disease conviction is high and subtly providing “medical” reassurance. The workshop will also examine metacognitions problematic in health anxiety, such as, ‘beliefs about biased thinking’ and how “feeling better” can be a major trigger for relapse.

Workshop participants will learn:

  1. The metacognitive model of health anxiety.
  2. Metacognitive treatment of health anxiety.
  3. How to avoid engagement with the content of patients’ distress.4. To identify problematic metacognitive beliefs that can lead to relapse.

MCT for Depression in Individual and Group Formats

Dr. Costas Papageorgiou
Priory Hospital, Altrincham

Growing empirical evidence supports the implementation of metacognitive therapy (MCT) for rumination and depression in both individual (Hagen et al., 2017; Wells et al., 2009, 2012) and group (Dammen, Papageorgiou & Wells, 2014; Papageorgiou & Wells, 2015) formats to maximise therapeutic effectiveness, prevent depressive relapse or recurrence, and address fundamental limitations of current treatments. MCT for depression aims to remove the metacognitive causes of rumination, which is a core process implicated in the maintenance and perpetuation of depression.The overall objective of this skills-based clinical workshop is to outline the components of  individual MCT for depression (Wells, 2009; Wells & Papageorgiou, 2004) and highlight effective practical adaptations for its delivery in group formats. The following key areas will be covered: the metacognitive model of rumination and depression; measurement of rumination and related constructs; case conceptualisation and socialisation; attention training and detached mindfulness; modifying metacognitive beliefs; developing new plans for processing, and relapse prevention. A combination of lecture, discussion, experiential, role-plays, and case presentations will be used to facilitate this workshop.

Key learning objectives:
(1) To gain up-to-date knowledge of the phenomenology of rumination and its relationship with depression
(2) To understand the principal features of the metacognitive model and therapy of rumination and depression
(3) To become familiar with the specific metacognitive treatment strategies and techniques for depression
(4) To gain insight into effective adaptations of MCT for depression for its implementation in group formats

Abstract Submissions

If you’re interested in presenting a symposium at the 2019 Metacognitive Therapy Conference in Prague, register here. The deadline is 31st October 2018, and all symposium submissions will be reviewed by the scientific committee.

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